Articles by theme

WMO congratulates the three scientists leading the research teams that will share the US$ 5 million grant from the United Arab Emirates Research Programme for Rain Enhancement Science.

  • Masataka Murakami, Visiting Professor from the Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya University (Japan), for his work on pre- cipitation enhancement in arid and semi-arid regions. Professor Murakami’s project focuses on innovative algorithms and sensors dedicated to identifying the clouds most

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Article published in Volume 51, No. 2, April 2002

For the first few months of its existence, the World Meteorological Organization utilized as its Headquarters the offices of its predecessor, the International Meteorological Organization, which were in Lausanne, Switzerland. On 10 December 1951, the Secretariat was moved to its temporary Headquarters at Campagne Rigot, Avenue de la Paix, Geneva, Switzerland. This building,...

 


 

There are no obituaries in the April 2008 Bulletin.

 

Bulletin nº

“Investments made in women and girls are great multipliers of development progress,” said WMO Secretary-General Petteri Taalas, who recently joined the ranks of the Geneva Gender Champions with a commitment to promote a gender-sensitive culture in WMO and to strive for gender parity. “In a world of diminishing resources, we must use human capital wisely and strategically. We must take full advantage of the capacity of both women and men...

Bulletin nº

The World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) serves as a fundamental basis for international climate research. The process represents a remarkable technical and scientific coordination effort across dozens of climate modelling centres, involving some 1 000 or more researchers. 

Bulletin nº

Those who question the importance of climate change sometimes claim that reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions into the atmosphere will have a very limited effect, because water vapour is the most dominant greenhouse gas. If that is the case, they wonder why bother so much about CO2 and other greenhouse gases? Observations by the WMO Global Atmosphere Watch programme have helped to investigate this in some detail.

Bulletin nº

Efforts to reduce fuel burn and thus carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in aviation over the past four decades have been impressive. Operational measures in line with new air traffic management systems, as well as new technological concepts, all have the potential to continue reducing these CO2 emissions. The Commission for Aeronautical Meteorology (CAeM) supports aviation stakeholders in their efforts to operate under changing climate conditions.

Bulletin nº

The management of weather and climate risks in agriculture has become an important issue due to climate change. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has highlighted multiple climate risks for agriculture and food security as well as the potential of improved weather and climate early warning systems to assist farmers. Wise use of weather and climate information can help to make better-informed policy, institutional and community decisions that reduce related risks and enhance opportunities, improve the efficient use of limited resources and increase crop, livestock and fisheries production. National Meteorological and Hydrological Services (NMHSs) have an important role to play in providing this weather and climate information to farmers, big and small.

Bulletin nº

At 05:16 UTC on 7 October 2014, the Japanese satellite Himawari-8 atop an H-IIA rocket took off from the Yoshinobu Launch Complex Pad 1 at the Tanegashima Space Centre in Japan. The launch was flawless and the satellite arrived a few weeks later at its final geostationary orbiting position 36 000 km above the equator at 140.5°E, just north of Papua New Guinea in the Western Pacific Ocean.  It was the first of a new generation of satellites that would start operations in the 2015-2021 timeframe. These new meteorological satellites have enhanced observation capability that will bring benefits, but also challenges for the National Meteorological and Hydrological Services (NMHSs). WMO and the Japan Meteorological Agency joined forces on the HimawariCast Project in order to assist them.

Bulletin nº

High costs and relatively low usage are major concerns for operational meteorological satellite systems. In the early 1990s, Tillman Mohr, then Director General of the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT), made a rough calculation that the operational cost of the constellation of meteorological satellites was in the order of US$ 2 million per day. However, a WMO survey conducted around the same time determined that many of its Members were not able to access and use satellite data and products in real time and were, thus, not able to reap the benefits of this major investment.