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Publish Date:
28 April 2017

There is a 50-60% chance of an El Niño event forming in middle to late 2017, according to a new Update from the World Meteorological Organization.

The El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a naturally occurring phenomenon involving fluctuating ocean temperatures in the central and eastern equatorial Pacific, coupled with changes in the atmosphere. It has a major influence on weather patterns in many parts of the world and has a warming impact on global air temperatures.

Publish Date:
27 April 2017

Normal rainfall is most likely during the 2017 Southwest monsoon season (June – September) over much of South Asia, according to the South Asian Climate Outlook Forum held in Bhutan 24-26 April. The outlook was developed through an expert assessment of various observed and emerging climatic features that influence the monsoon, including the El Niño~Southern Oscillation (ENSO).

The Southwest monsoon accounts for 70-80 percent of annual rainfall in most countries of South Asia. It is a key driver of socio-economic development and well-being in the world’s most densely-populated region which is regularly hit by devastating flooding and damaging droughts.

Publish Date:
26 April 2017

A new report from the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP) on Snow, Water, Ice and Permafrost in the Arctic highlights the rapid and widespread changes in the Arctic’s sensitive climate systems mostly due to rising concentrations of greenhouse gases.

 

One of the key findings of the report by AMAP, which is one of the six working groups of the Arctic Council, is that “the Arctic’s climate is shifting to a new state.”

 

Publish Date:
25 April 2017

Significant progress has been made over the past decade in improving understanding of droughts and their impacts. However, several questions remain, including the real costs to a country’s economy, and whether the price of preparing for droughts is worth it. A new study released by the World Meteorological Organization and Global Water Partnership seeks to answer these questions.

Publish Date:
25 April 2017

The Pacific Community (SPC) remains committed to assist Pacific Island countries with strengthening their early warning systems and weather forecasting mechanisms for sustainable development. As part of this effort, SPC is developing a coastal inundation forecasting tool for the World Meteorological Organization’s (WMO) Coastal Inundation Forecasting Demonstration Project (CIFPD) in Fiji.This tool will be demonstrated in the Coral Coast before being replicated in other areas within Fiji including the Nadi River catchment.This project has been established at the request of the Fiji Meteorological Service (FMS) and made possible with donor funding from the Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) in 2017.

The Third Pacific Meteorological Council opened in the Kingdom of Tonga today bringing together over 1

The globally averaged temperature over land and ocean surfaces for January to June 2015, as well as fo