Articles by theme

WMO congratulates the three scientists leading the research teams that will share the US$ 5 million grant from the United Arab Emirates Research Programme for Rain Enhancement Science.

  • Masataka Murakami, Visiting Professor from the Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya University (Japan), for his work on pre- cipitation enhancement in arid and semi-arid regions. Professor Murakami’s project focuses on innovative algorithms and sensors dedicated to identifying the clouds most

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Article published in Volume 51, No. 2, April 2002

For the first few months of its existence, the World Meteorological Organization utilized as its Headquarters the offices of its predecessor, the International Meteorological Organization, which were in Lausanne, Switzerland. On 10 December 1951, the Secretariat was moved to its temporary Headquarters at Campagne Rigot, Avenue de la Paix, Geneva, Switzerland. This building,...

 


 

There are no obituaries in the April 2008 Bulletin.

 

Bulletin nº

In recent years, climate variability and change have had a global impact and a great number of States from around the world participated in COP 21 (Conference of the Parties to the Climate Change Convention held in Paris, France between 30 November and 15 December 2016), the agreements reached there are the proof of the relevance of this issue.

Bulletin nº

Haiti, the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere, is extremely vulnerable to natural disasters. Situated on the western third of the island of Hispaniola, the country regularly experiences major earthquakes, hurricanes, tropical storms, droughts and flooding events. The impact of these has been further aggravated by deforestation that has left the urban and rural areas where the poorest segment of the population live exposed to landslides following heavy rainfall. Each successive disaster takes a toll on the Haitian economy and further hinders its sustainable development.  The development of impact-based multi-hazard early warning systems is a priority for Haiti to achieve Sustainable Development Goal One (SDG-1) “Reducing poverty in all its forms everywhere.”

Bulletin nº

Renewable energy is central to the global effort to move to less carbon-intensive economies that support the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The energy sector currently accounts for more than two thirds of global greenhouse gas emissions (Global Wind Energy Council 2016). Consequently, the global transition to a low-carbon future portends a fundamental and comprehensive change for the entire energy sector (Organisation for Economic Co-operation (OECD) and Development and International Energy Agency 2016).

Bulletin nº

Despite substantial advances in forecasting and emergency preparedness, weather-related disasters continue to kill, to displace populations, and to damage property and infrastructure. Even less severe weather events place an increasing strain on society. This is especially the case in countries with fragile economies and infrastructure. Such events challenge the objectives of the Sustainable Development Goals, by pushing people back into poverty, destroying food crops, contaminating water supplies, disrupting education, undermining health and destroying businesses. The potential of advanced weather-related hazard forecasts to reduce these impacts has been demonstrated in developed countries.

Bulletin nº

Climate services are fundamental for enabling national and local decision-makers to maintain and boost resilience in view of the increase in frequency and intensity of extreme weather and climate events due to climate change. Better availability of, access to and use of climate services is indispensable for addressing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the  Priorities for Action in the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, the Paris agreement of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and other international frameworks. Climate services are also vital for implementing effective climate mitigation and adaptation measures and for instigating societal transformation.

Bulletin nº

Despite the great complexity of climate change, scientists must accept the challenge of communicating their findings to policymakers and the general public. They must do this in a way that is simple enough for non-specialists to understand, but not so simple that it distorts the science. Climate science is often communicated through well-written technical reports, but it can also be effectively explained through graphics, animations, oral presentations, compelling narratives, trusted messengers, and popular books and films.

Bulletin nº

As a specialized agency of the United Nations and on behalf of its 191 Members, WMO is committed to achieving the goals and targets laid out in global development frameworks, above all the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. On SDG number 5 "Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls," WMO is mainstreaming gender issues in its governance, working structures, programmes and service delivery by attracting more women into scientific fields and improving their access to technology, information, science education and technical training. This commitment strengthens the position of women as scientists, technologists and users of weather, water and climate services and fosters increased participation of women in weather and climate policy and decision-making.