Press Releases

Publish Date:
17 November 2016

17 November 2016 (Marrakech, Morocco) - African least developed countries and Pacific Islands will be the first to benefit from upgraded early warning systems against weather and climate-related shocks under an action plan outlined at the United Nations climate change conference.

Publish Date:
14 November 2016

It is very likely that 2016 will be the hottest year on record, with global temperatures even higher than the record-breaking temperatures in 2015. Preliminary data shows that 2016’s global temperatures are approximately 1.2° Celsius above pre-industrial levels, according to an assessment by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).

Publish Date:
8 November 2016

Extreme weather increasingly linked to global warming

The World Meteorological Organization has published a detailed analysis of the global climate 2011-2015 – the hottest five-year period on record  - and the increasingly visible human footprint on extreme weather and climate events with dangerous and costly impacts.

The record temperatures were accompanied by rising sea levels and declines in Arctic sea-ice extent, continental glaciers and northern hemisphere snow cover. 

Publish Date:
24 October 2016

High greenhouse gas levels mark start of new era of climate reality

Globally averaged concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere reached the symbolic and significant milestone of 400 parts per million for the first time in 2015 and surged again to new records in 2016 on the back of the very powerful El Niño event, according to the World Meteorological Organization’s annual Greenhouse Gas Bulletin.

CO2 levels had previously reached the 400 ppm barrier for certain months of the year and in certain locations but never before on a global average basis for the entire year. The longest-established greenhouse gas monitoring station at Mauna Loa, Hawaii, predicts that CO2 concentrations will stay above 400 ppm for the whole of 2016 and not dip below that level for many generations.

Publish Date:
19 October 2016

The World Meteorological Organization is forecasting that the weather over large parts of the world will be influenced by cool-neutral to weak La Niña conditions over the coming few months.

Today’s WMO Update finds that there is a 50-60% probability that weak La Niña conditions are developing that may persist into the first quarter of 2017. This is based on an expert assessment of the results of climate models run by the world’s leading prediction centers – around half of which predict that weak La Niña conditions will develop during the final quarter of 2016, while the others suggest a weakening to neutral conditions.