Press Releases

Publish Date:
20 May 2020

As the world continue to manage the deadly Covid-19 virus and looks at ensuring that the recovery addresses climate change threats, the significance of advanced multi-hazard threat warnings and risk information has never been more widely acknowledged. This is highlighted in the 2019 Annual Report of the Climate Risk & Early Warning Systems (CREWS) initiative, released today jointly by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), the World Bank Group / Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery (GFDRR), and the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNDRR).

WMO
Publish Date:
20 May 2020

The World Meteorological Organization’s Scientific Advisory Panel has elected a new chair and vice-chair to cement engagement with the broad science community and support the evolution of its mandate in weather, climate, water and related environmental and social sciences. As a part of historical WMO reform process two new scientific bodies have been established. Scientific Advisory Panel, consisting of world leading scientists, serves as a major think tank giving strategic guidance in decadal timeframe. Research Board consists of high-level experts on weather, climate and water research related to service and infrastructure development.

Publish Date:
12 May 2020

Warmer than average sea surface temperatures across large parts of the globe in May and June are expected to result in above-normal land temperatures, particularly at tropical latitudes and much of the northern hemisphere, according to a new Global Seasonal Climate Update compiled for the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). The global warming trend is a contributory factor to this.

Publish Date:
7 May 2020

The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) is concerned about the increasing impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the quantity and quality of weather observations and forecasts, as well as atmospheric and climate monitoring.

Publish Date:
22 April 2020

COVID-19 exacerbates socio-economic impacts of climate change, which accelerated in past 5 years

In the 50 years since the first celebration of Earth Day, the physical signs of climate change and impacts on our planet have gathered pace, reaching a crescendo in the past five years, which were the hottest on record. That trend is expected to continue, according to the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).